Monthly Archives: December 2014

Tri Speak: How to Survive the Holidays with the Non-Tri Relatives

bikewithlightsEver wonder how to relate to the relatives who have no idea why you don spandex 100 days a year and have a shelf just for protein bars and the like in your pantry? Pro-triathlete (and hack comedian) Jesse Thomas has some answers. 

Like many of us, I will head home for the holidays. This means I’ll spend lots of time with my extremely non-triathlete family. My family’s idea of a triathlon is dinner, dessert AND a movie. In fact, I have seen some of them complete two full triathlons in the same day. Impressive.

Spending time with non-triathletes can be really fun. In a lot of ways it’s exactly what you need after spending all summer and fall training and racing with a bunch of tri dorks. In addition to what I consider normal holiday non-triathloning— fueling with boysenberry pie and ice cream, training to the theater (the same as walking, but you use a Garmin and upload it to Strava)—it’s also a time to take a break from the high-level tri talk of your triathlete friends. I can guarantee you nobody in my family will ask me what percentage my lactate threshold wattage changed over the past year, if tubular tires run faster at 110 or 120 psi, or whether Yamamoto 40 is really all it’s cracked up to be. We don’t get much beyond debating who had the smelliest fart on that one drive to the coast (it was DEFINITELY me, by the way).
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5 Off-Season Rules

guy_running_cold

Clearly different levels of crazy exist for off-season dedication.

We at SDTriNews.com feel the need periodically to share some of our favorite articles with our favorite readers. This piece is one such occasion. 

5 Off-Season Rules

To prep your body for a better 2015 season, you need to play by the rules now.

Welcome to the off-season! Pat yourself on the back for another solid year and go into the winter with a real plan—but don’t fall into the trap of attempting to carry PR fitness through to spring.

“There’s a fear that you’re never going to get it back,” says Gordo Byrn, co-author of Going Long and head coach of Endurance Corner (Endurancecorner.com). “But you’ve been there before. If you had a breakthrough year, you have to treat yourself to some recovery.” That doesn’t mean you should throw your bike in the garage and spend three months eating nachos on the couch. Now’s the time to shift your focus to overall health and move away from structured training.

No off-season plan is “one size fits all.” What you do during the winter should reflect your goals in the spring. If you’re a mid-pack athlete who’s in the sport to have fun, you can probably have a relatively laid-back winter. But if you’re a competitive age-grouper vying for a Kona spot, you probably can’t afford to stop running until March. “If you have specific goals, you need to measure them out,” says coach Patrick McCrann of Endurance Nation (Endurancenation.us). “If you need to bike a 5:30, that’s a number you can start working toward. Is it more important to have fun now or are your goals more important?”
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